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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)
of scotland yard stepped down amid public outrage yesterday. >> stephen: big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns. that's news. now thankfully, folks, there is a voice of reason out there. boston friend steve doocy who last friday blew the lid back on to this story with some pr guy who may or may not be employed by rupert murdoch. jimmy, pitch me off a deuce. >> what do you make of what this particular hacking scandal with the news of the world. >> the "news of the world" is a hacking scandal t can't be denied but the issue really is why are so many people piling on at this point. >> avenue's got some serious problems in this country right now. we are teetering on default with. what do they do. they talk about this. >> we know it is a hacking scandal. shouldn't we get beyond it and really deal with the issue of hacking? i mean citicorp has been hacked into. bank of america has been hacked into. i think any of the same kind of attention for hacking that took place less than a year
intense pressure after it emerged that scotland yard hired a former "news of the world" editor as a media consultant in 2009. the same year investigators decided not to further pursue the phone hacking case. the former editor, neil wallace, was arrested last week in connection with the scandal. >> i have a suggestion that we must have suspected the alleged involvement of mr. wallace in phone hacking. let me say unequivocally that i did not and have no reason to do so. >> reporter: even with the head of police preparing to step down, scotland yard continues to make arrests. today, it was rebekah brooks, former head of rupert murdoch's newspaper arm here in the uk, who resigned herself on friday. it was just a week ago that murdoch flew to london and stood by her side, all smiles. brooks had a meteoric rise at the company, becoming editor of "news of the world" when she was only 32. it was in 2002, with brooks at the paper's helm, that "news of the world" reporters allegedly hacked the phone of murdered teenager milly dowler. a case that shocked and infuriated this country. brooks denies an
that is a good question. why didn't scotland yard stop them. maybe it had something to do with this. >> routinely, the news of the world was paying at least some police officers at scotland yard. [bleep], [bleep]. >> yeah. >> jon: oh jesus. >> jon, do you want a snack taver doodle. they're very bland. >> jon: can't your prime minister or anybody -- >> the prime minister, the prime minister, is that what you are talking about, david cameron, the prime minister. >> jon: yes. >> leader of new england. >> jon: right. >> a funny story about him, jon. the former editor of the news of the world, andy coulson, the one who preside at the paper, some of its most egregious hacking scan will das and resigned in disgrace was hired by none other than than, wait for it, you're going to love it. >> jon: no, no, no dot. >> yes, david cam'ron. >> jon: no, [bleep] oh my god, my balls just crawled back up into my body. >> oh, god! >> jon: why would they do that? oh, you people are gar badge. >> yes, yes! yes, we are. >> jon: are you terrible people. >> yes! an jon, the truth is, it only ended now for the brave ree o
. >> big deal. who cares if the head of scotland yard resigns. why is scotland yard policing england anyway? call me when the head of england yard resigns nap's news. >> time for your political ticker with tim farley. listen, i want to show you a poll. as the clock ticks -- as we get closer to that deadline for the debt ceiling, a new cbs poll shows that 46% say that the debt ceiling should be raised. compared to 24% in june. 49% shouldn't compared to 69% in june. the president has asked for a deal to get done by friday. what is your sense of it? >> sense right now is that -- something. it closer to the mitch mcconnell solution. which would involve a less con view lated series of events. the president vie toting the house and senate. i think that's the direction we're heading. some things in there about cuts. we'll have to wait and see. i hi we'll know by friday where we are going on this, finally. >> a couple of distractions. one is news corporation. people are paying attention to thatpy understand both martin sheen and michael vick are going to be on capitol hill and it has nothing to do
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
in scotland with all the pomp, circumstance and ceremony as britain celebrates another royal newly wed couple. as britain celebrates another royal newly wed couple. today sunday, july 31, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a sunday. i'm lester holt. >> i'm jenna wolfe. we're just 48 hours from the point where the nation is unable to pay all of its bills and risk default but this morning some signs of progress. >> we have details of a possible detail coming out last night when harry reid said the two senates were trying to nail down loose ends and complete an agreement. >> we should stress, there is no deal quite yet. the situation is still quite fragile, but both sides are hoping to end this bittal debt limit showdown before the august 2nd deadline on tuesday. >> the senate delayed its critical vote until 1:00 p.m. today amid growing indications that this compromise could be in the works that would avert a federal default tuesday. we have the story covered from capitol hill to the white house. we begin this morning with nbc's
, the head of scotland yard, has resigned, and the well-connected former chief executive of rupert murdoch's news international has been arrested. elizabeth palmer rorz. >> reporter: rebekah brooks had willingly made an appointment to go to the police station to answer questions when she arrived, she was arrested. anything she tells detectives now will become a formal part of the criminal inquiry into phone hacking and bribery of the "news of the world." brooks' arrest came as a surprise, but this was a shock. >> i have this afternoon informed the palace, secretary and the mayor of my intention to resign as commissioner of the metropolitan police service. >> reporter: the powerful head of london's police force resigned, not because he's personally suspected of wrongdoing but it was on his watch that the former "news of the editor" neil wallace as hired as a pr consultant to the police. he's since been arrested in connection with hacking. when this scandal exploded two weeks ago no one dreamed how many powerful people would be dragged in and down. in the u.s., les hinton, head of dow jones
: london's police chief resigned under intense pressure after it emerged scotland yard hired a former news much the world editor as media consultant. the same year investigators decided not to pursue the phone hacking case. neil wallace was arrested last week in connection with the scandal. >> i have heard suggestions we must are suspected the alleged involvement of mr. wallace in phone hacking. let me say unequivocally, that i did not and had no reason to do so. >> reporter: even with the head of police preparing to step down, scotland yard continues to make arrests. today it was rebekah brooks, former head of rupert murdoch's newspaper arm in the uk who resigned herself on friday. it was just a week ago murdoch flew to london and stood by her side, all smiles. brooks had a rise at the krngs becoming editor of "news of the world" when she was only 32. neil sean worked for another murdoch paper "the sun" and now an nbc analyst. >> she rose to the top through sheer ambition, fantastic networking and an ability to do the job. >> reporter: in 2002 with brooks at the paper's helm that "news of
scotland yard hired a former "news of the world" editor as a media consultant in 2009. the same year investigators decided not to further pursue the phone-hacking case. the former editor, neil wallace, was arrested last week in connection with the scandal. >> i have heard suggestions we must have suspected the alleged involvement of mr. wallace in phone hacking. let me say unequivocally that i did not and had no reason to do so. >> reporter: even with the head of police preparing to step down, scotland yard continues to make arrests. rebekah brooks, former head of rupert murdoch's newspaper arm here in the uk who resigned herself on friday. it was just a week ago that murdoch flew to london and stood by her side, all smiles. brooks had a immediate otheric rise at the condition, becoming editor of "news of the world" when she was only 32. neil sean worked for another murdoch newspaper, "the sun". >> she rose to the top through sheer ambition, networking and an ability to do the job. >> reporter: in 2002 with brooks at the paper's helm that "news of the world" reporters allegedly hacke
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
be a more down to earth affair. the latest on that ceremony from scotland coming up. >>> are you ready to return to the '80s? >> i still live in the '80s. >> we're really going to take you back because we have one of the most popular bands of all time standing by for a big summer concert. >> journey out on the plaza. they're going to be performing on what is a stage that is still drying out from overnight rain. we're happy about that. see them in our 8:30 half hour. >>> let's begin with the debt ceiling crisis in washington. kelly o'donnell has been covering this story. she's got the latest this morning. kelly, good morning. >> good morning, ann. from delayed to potentially derailed, is that where we are this morning? hours and hours went by overnight when house speaker john boehner and his leadership team were trying to get a handful of their own members to go along, to come together on a solution to raise the debt ceiling and to cut spending. but they are nowhere. so now we know that all the republican house members will meet this morning to try to find a way out. >> it's time for so
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
. there was a bribery scandal. the head of scotland yard is going to resign. i think they are going to try to bring it to the united states. i don't know that anything has been done here. somebody might have hacked into the 9/11 folks. i don't think the wall street journal had anything to do with that. i don't know that any of that went on here and as of right now, it's still in london. a lot of folks want to bring it here. >> what is your opinion on that, ed? >> other than the potential hacking into the 9/11 victims, i'm not sure pat is wrong on this. he may be right. the one thing we don't want it to become, speaking as a democratic progressive. we don't want it to be a witch hunt on murdock. we don't need that. >> right. >> the story is bad enough on its own. >> andrea, let me invite you in on this. we are expecting testimony from murdock and his son tomorrow. that's going to be a circus-like scene. it's unclear who had connection to all of this. >> i think they all have connections. anyone who has lived or worked there knows. peter you spent a lot of time in london, you know the close connectio
, and scotland yard said there be more bombshell revelations to come. mark phillips, cbs news, london. >> we'll stay on top of that story for you. >>> straight ahead your wednesday morning weather and in sports the mets shows sparkling defense at dodger's stadium and some power, too. you know what this is, cartwright? yes. nicorette mini. you carry them around everywhere. yes i do, because cravings are everywhere. would you take a craving for me, cartwright? how would i -- exactly. [ male announcer ] nicorette mini goes wherever you go, to help make quitting suck less. [ male announcer ] nicorette mini goes wherever you go, meet beth, nursery school teacher. lights, camera, activia it's the best job in the world. my students are amazing. but to be there for them, you've gotta feel your best. kids can tell. that's why i love eating activia every day. so delicious activia helps me feel good inside. which helps me be my best... positive, cheerful and on top of things. help regulate your digestive system. love how you feel or your money back. ♪ activia >>> here's a look at the weather in some
rarity. there are examples in the museum in scotland, but they are highly desirable to collectors. we're talking about between £10,000 and 15,000. wow! i'd no idea it was worth that much. i wonder who used to sit in them when they were first made. so do i. they are some of the most eccentric chairs i've ever seen. do you know whether they've come out of a house in england or ireland? well, i have no knowledge, but i should guess ireland because my grandfather was irish and proud of it too, he always used to say. surprisingly enough, they are a celebration of love, because the scallop shell is the badge of venus, the goddess of love. i imagine that in spite of their rather small scale, they were originally intended to stand in some extraordinary architectural grotto somewhere. to be honest, the only time i've ever really seen this really wonderful eccentric carving and this very distinctive bold colour scheme of using the ebonising and the parcel gilding is actually on irish mirrors of the 1820s and 1830s. that's very interesting. what is interesting is their form is purely venetian.
: the police out of scotland yard have been in the crosshairs. amy kellogg is live in london beginning our coverage there. >> reporter: when the murdochs testify they are obliged to answer questions quote by their honor. a lot of people are saying because this meeting before a parliamentary committee and judge-led and police-led inquiries, the panel must prove this is not just a piece of political theater. there has been immense media interest. cameras were out as james murdoch left his home to go to news international offices and snappers chased rupert murdoch as he left his home. they will answer questions for an hour. and that's starting in half-hour. then rebekah brooks who used to run murdoch's british newspaper empire until last week will answer questions. a limited number of the public are being allowed in. people were lined up at 7:00 a.m. and the line stretched around the block trying to get a seat. the police are still also under allegation of corruption. this story has so many 10 kals, many threads of inquiry even as it involves police involvement. a news of the word reporter wa
're seeing it happen in great britain. the idea that scotland yard and the prime minister and, you know, journalists at "news of the world" -- >> i feel like it's people whether you read the wiki leaks things or -- you go, of course, of course, and then some of the sex scanned always, of course he was sending a pictures of himself, or you see, of course, of course they're hacking. it's one of those things like where it's your worst fear, but it keeps getting confirmed. >> what it shows me is my how tame my own formr form of journalism is. i do think for murdoch, when you talk to folks like eliot spitzer, but there's a real threat to his fcc licenses, because bribing northeastern people if you're a u.s.-based company means you have vulnerability. >> if you're not familiar, which we're all kind of learning this away, america has the law called 9 foreign corrupt practices act, which means if you do business in america, and you exhibit corrupt behavior of some kind, paying bribes, in a foreign land, so let's say you're an oil company bribing somebody in russia to get access to an oil field,
and the role of the media in government. rupert's son, and the british publishing executives and scotland yard top cop all in the dragnet drilled by british lawmakers on allegation of hacking, spying and bribing, oh, yes, all the way up to 10 downing street, the british version of pennsylvania avenue. amazing show for you. i'm dylan ratigan. house is minority whip steny hoyer along talking debt. and
in scotland but as a matter of principle refuse to alternative services as well and sent to prison. more than 6,000 young englishmen went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to the point* in time ever imprisoned for political reasons, they serve the sentences in places like here coming southwest london, that metal netting stretching across the opening is to prevent people from committing suicide. and prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under the rule of silence rerun not allowed to talk to our fellow prisoners. they found ways around a buy tapping and whispering but to live under those conditions was tough. the diet was terrible, shortage comment it was cold and many people died in prison. i was fascinated by the stories. for the longest time i could not figure out how from a story telling point* of view i would get the resistors and the generals into the same book. i did not want to do a series of portraits of one then the other but then a clue came to me one day when i wis reading a scholarly article about a well-known pacifist. she was the ardent o
into the plane off to scotland because -- that would have been tremendously helpful. [laughter] >> [inaudible] >> thank you very much indeed. [applause] [inaudible conversations] >> historian andrew roberts on booktv. visit the author's website andrew-roberts.net. >> what are you reading this summer in book tvments to know. >> first book on my reading list this spring and summer was kleopatra, and what a great insight in recounting her life. it was a book recommended to me, and so i decided to pick it up and read it and then continued with the strong woman theme if you will with elizabeth the first, and that's on my ipad, i'm reading these both as e-books. going back doing these two, it got me on to the historical and older novel type approach and with my bible study group, i'm rereading pilgrim's progress which is delightful to get back into that. it's been awhile since i've reread it and because there's a movie coming up, i, with my family, we're rereading atlas which is very tel
at scotland yard. i always put the victim fifirst but here i didn't follow my principle, and that is my greatest regret. this morning, murdock arrived here in london from the u.s. to try to contain the crisis. but it may be too late. it may have already derailed a plan to take over the $20 billion b sky b satellite network. >> i think people learn about the fufu extent of what happened, what started as a public relations nightmare could become a financial problem. >> reporter: not just a financial problem, also a legal problem. murdoch's own son is one of many people who could face criminal charges. a footnote, here on the independent sunday, a little jab at "the news of the world," no phone hacking, no law breaking just good, honest journalism. bianna. >>> no doubt a huge shock for the publication world. jeffrey, thank you. some of those newspapers will cover why we're here in los angeles. of coursrstalking about the royal couple in america. last night in this theater, it was all about hollywood glamour and star power. who better than abc's bob woodruff to tell us about the night? it w
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 94 (some duplicates have been removed)